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StratPlan

Chris LoCurto

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October 27, 2015

High Levels of Quality Communication

October 27, 2015 | By | 2 Comments">2 Comments

COMMUNICATION

Today, on the podcast, we are answering a question that came in from one of our listeners.

Justin writes, “I have to start with the obvious. Thanks for all that you guys are doing and keep killing it. I know you’re always open to suggestions for podcast topics, and yes we are, so I wanted to throw out the idea of doing something high level on communication, and maybe topic in with your top 10 recommended books on communication.

I loved your list on the poverty mindset. I know how important you think communication is, and I think most of your listeners could benefit from what you have to say on the topic and from the books you recommend. Thanks again, and keep up the good work.”

Thank you Justin, we appreciate all of that. I’m going to answer Justin’s question but before I do I have created a tool for you to use to help you better communicate.

There are some do’s and some don’ts of body language when you’re communicating effectively. So make sure that you get today’s download if you want to know these things, and you want the power of understanding body language, and the things to do and not to do for effective communication. 

dos-and-donts-button

Now on to Justin’s question. Here are eleven ways that will help you have high levels of quality communication.

Verbal Communication

To have great communication skills, you have to start with caring for the other person. Yes, I said caring! Caring that they are not only an emotional being, but that they are a child of the Most High God! Which means He cares about how you treat them!

For communication sake, caring means that you are focused on leaning in the direction of the other person, so they can successfully understand what you are saying. This happens by understanding how they receive information, by staying calm, being focused, polite, interested, and to match the mood or emotion of the situation.

You first have to understand the person you’re talking to. How do they receive information? If they received it in sound bytes, it they need the scroll that is 10-feet long, if they need energy and excitement with it, if they need understanding and the least amount of conflict.

Whatever it is, you have to start by understanding how they receive information. That way, you can give it to them well. By staying calm in the process, by being focused on the things that you’re saying, by being polite, by caring about matching the emotion of the situation, whatever that is, the mood of the situation, make sure that you are following all of these pieces.

We are so usually focused on our own feelings that we don’t think about how difficult we make it for others when we communicate. I watch people be so absolutely short in their verbal communication, and give so little detail that there is no wonder why the other person doesn’t understand. If that is you, you’re not doing a good job verbally giving information.

Non-verbal communication

Your body language is constantly speaking. I am always watching every bit of body language from our attendees. It doesn’t matter who it is. Anybody coming in, I’m always watching body language. It’s nonstop. It tells me a ton about what they are experiencing.

It even tells me what they’re thinking. I can see things by the way that they respond. You can see specific responses that will tell you what people are thinking. There are all kinds of things that I watch. I watch whether people cross their legs.

Do they cross them towards somebody against, away from somebody, whatever it is? Do they put themselves in a position of power, where they feel more powerful when they’re talking?

All of that stuff is nonverbal communication, all of your facial expressions, your eye contact, whether you have it or whether you don’t, your posture, your gestures with your extremities.

Even the way you position yourself physically in a room, where you put yourself, where you stand, do you put yourself in the middle of conversations? Do you put yourself to the outside?

Whatever that is, all of that is revealing a lot about you, and for better or for worse. It could be good. It could be bad. Either way, you’ve got to understand that your body language tells a ton. You’ve got to understand your non-verbals.

Listen

Great communicators are incredible listeners, not good listeners, incredible listeners. Crappy communicators cannot wait for the other person to take a breath, so they can speak. You know them.

You’ve experienced those people. That may be you. Listening is half of the equation that makes me great at leading and coaching people.

Without it, I wouldn’t have any clients. They wouldn’t want to hang around. If all you do is communicate what you think someone needs to hear without listening to them, how will you ever know if you’re communicating successfully? If you’re going to communicate well, you have to listen really well. 

Patience

It needs to be at least equal to the content you’re communicating. Let me give a quick dive on that. You hear me say all the time it is your job as a leader to make your team successful. If you’re trying to make a team member successful, then your patience has to line up with the thing that you’re trying to teach.

If you’re trying to teach them or communicate to them how to make coffee, probably, not a whole lot of patience needed here. We probably need to run through this once or twice, but you really should have this after that. If you’re trying to delegate large tasks, then you have to have patience.

You have to understand that you may not be doing a great job communicating, or the way that they receive it may take more time. Understand that.

If you are just giving somebody an update, then understand that the patience for that is considerably less than making a team member successful on a large delegation project. If you’re giving an update, have the patience for them to ask questions, and make sure that they understand what it is that you’re updating on. 

Then if the ox is in the ditch, if it’s an emergency, then the patience is considerably less. “Hey guys, this is something we’ve got to do right now. Now unless somebody has some phenomenal input, we’ve got to go. Go, go, go.”

I’m the kind of leader who is always trying to teach. I’m always trying to make my team successful. I would spend a lot of time making sure that they understand stuff. If there is an emergency, if there is something we’ve got to get after, then there’ve been times that I’ve walked up to a team member and said, “Hey, listen, I don’t have time to explain this.

I need you to do this. Just go in this direction right now. This is something we’ve got to do. We’ve got a problem. We’ve got an emergency. Just make this happen. I’ll explain later, or we can talk through, or when the situations are normal, then I will sit down and teach.

This isn’t the time for me to teach. I need you to go move in this direction.” You’ve got to have patience, but make sure that it’s equal to the content that you’re communicating.

Ask Questions

Questioning is one of the best ways for you to gain perspective. It is the thing that shows people that you’re interested in them. It’s the thing that shows them that you’re listening. It also helps you to get a lot of information.

We don’t do a good job gaining perspectives. Since we’re not asking a lot of questions, since we’re not getting a lot of perspective, what tends to happen is we make uninformed decisions, or we show people that we don’t really care. We don’t want to dig further.

We don’t want to know more, and so they don’t care. They give up. You’ve got to make sure. Ask questions. Ask quality questions as well. Care enough to find out. The more perspective you have, the greater decision-making process you have.

Decision-making processes are usually junked up because of a lack of perspective. Make sure you’re asking great questions. I’m talking about the stuff that helps you to get real, good quality information. The more you do that, the better you’re going to be at communicating.

Respect

You have to respect people. You have to respect their situations and what they’re maybe going through. Stop and respect people. Respect their time. Respect their emotions.

Problem Solve

In high levels of quality communication, you have to be able to identify exactly what the problem is. You do that by dissecting the problem, so it’s fully understood. This goes back to question asking, listening, and patience.

You do that by gaining the information, not just talking or making statements about it, but gaining great perspective and then setting up a system of strategies or objectives to solve the problem.

Then taking that information, and putting together whatever it is that you’re going to do to solve the problem, putting together some objectives to get this thing done, whatever that is. Great communicators are also great problem solvers, or at least they can guide information to getting the problem solved.

Socially Aware

Understand you have to be in tune with other’s emotions. It is absolutely essential to understand. It is something that you need as an interpersonal skill. Is somebody going through something incredibly painful? Did they just lose a relative, or did they get fired from a job, or, or, or?”

Whatever that is, be aware. Be in tune. See how they are. Also, being aware of, like I said, what are people experiencing. If you’re the leader, what are they experiencing with the work that you’ve put on them? Have you done too much? Have you done too little? Are they being demeaned, whatever it is? Think about those things.

Self-Management

You have to be in control of your emotions. You have to be thinking about what is appropriate behavior. You have to be responding appropriately with appropriate behavior to the situation itself. What does it need?

If you’re flying off the handle on something that is absolutely small it does not require what’s nothing really requires, you’re flying off the handle. If you are overdoing it because you’re stressed out, if you’re overdoing it because of something you’re going through, you can’t just sit there and think, “Well, I’m going to respond this way. I don’t care what anybody thinks.”

It means you got to control yourself. You have to not get angry. There are times where I could be totally frustrated with a team member because of something that’s going on. The first question I have to ask, I have to self-manage myself, “Is this my fault? Did I not do a good job communicating? Am I the one to blame here? If not, then why didn’t I catch this?”

I first always try and look at myself, and say, “How are you the one who is contributing to this problem,” and solve it? Don’t get a little crazy. Don’t get frustrated. Understand what’s happening. Be aware of yourself. Be aware of your behavior.

Responsible and Accountable

You have to be responsible and accountable with your actions, with your communication. Responsibility says personal responsibility, being mature. If you say that you’re going to do something, actually do it.

If you say that you’re going to do something and you don’t, take responsibility. If something crashes or goes wrong because of something you did or did not do, take responsibility. “Guys, I am so sorry. That is my bad. I did that. I know I failed that. I screwed that up.” Whatever it is, take responsibility.

Also, hold yourself accountable for your own actions. One of the things I’m always doing or at least trying to do with myself is I’m always trying to tell myself, “Hey man, look at this situation. You need to act. You need to take responsibility. You need to apologize. You need to do whatever.”

That part of accountability and holding my own self accountable by calling my own self out helps me to be not only a great communicator, but it also gains a lot of respect. It also gains a lot of loyalty, because when others see that I am very quick to call myself, and I think I’m right, I think I’m right.

The moment I realize I’m not, “Hey, I’m wrong. I’m sorry, I’m wrong. I screwed that up. I did this or whatever.” That is a part of accountability. Get on it. Take responsibility. Hold yourself accountable.

Assertive

This should not be used as a license to be a jerk. I am not talking about you being assertive in the jerk way, where you just start ripping on people. That is not what I’m saying at all. What I am saying is that it goes hand and hand with what you hear me saying when it comes to things like healthy boundaries.

If somebody’s trying to control you, trying to manipulate you, just not respecting you in this situation, then you may need to go ahead and give a little push back. You may need to go ahead and be a little assertive. Put a good healthy boundary in place. I am not saying being assertive by being a jerk. Please understand that.

These are all things that I want you to be thinking about. If you want to have high levels of quality communication, if you want to be a great communicator, if you want to lead your team well, if you want to do the things that create success for team members, create success for you, so you can communicate well in your relationships, in your work, whatever it is, then these are things you need to be focused on, things you need to be thinking about. By doing these, you would become a great communicator.

 

As promised, here are my top books for better communication:

Everyone Communicates, Few Connect: What the Most Effective People Do Differently, by John C. Maxwell

  • John C. Maxwell says if you want to succeed, you must learn how to connect with people. In Everyone Communicates, Few Connect, Maxwell shares the Five Principles and Five Practices to develop the crucial skill of connecting

How To Win Friends and Influence People, by Dale Carnegie

  • Three fundamental techniques in handling people
  • The six ways to make people like you
  • The twelve ways to win people to you way of thinking
  • The nine ways to change people without arousing resentment

Safe People, by Henry Cloud, John Townsend 

  • Solid guidance for making safe choices in relationships, from friendships to romance. They help identify the nurturing people we all need in our lives, as well as ones we need to learn to avoid. Safe People will help you to recognize 20 traits of relationally untrustworthy people. Discover what makes some people relationally safe, and how to avoid unhealthy entanglements. You’ll learn about things within yourself that jeopardize your relational security. And you’ll find out what to do and what not to do to develop a balanced, healthy approach to relationships.

Crucial Conversations, by Kerry Patterson

  • Prepare for high-stakes situations
  • Transform anger and hurt feelings into powerful dialogue
  • Make it safe to talk about almost anything
  • Be persuasive, not abrasive

Made To Stick, by Chip Heath, Dan Heath

  • A book that will transform the way you communicate ideas, Made to Stick shows us the vital principles of winning ideas–and tells us how we can apply these rules to making our own messages stick. 

Communicating for a Change, by Andy Stanley

  • In Communicating for a Change, Andy Stanley and Lane Jones offer a unique strategy for communicators seeking to deliver captivating and practical messages. In this highly creative presentation, the authors unpack seven concepts that will empower you to engage and impact your audience in a way that leaves them wanting more.

The Tipping Point, by Malcolm Gladwell

  • The tipping point is that magic moment when an idea, trend, or social behavior crosses a threshold, tips, and spreads like wildfire. Just as a single sick person can start an epidemic of the flu, so too can a small but precisely targeted push cause a fashion trend, the popularity of a new product, or a drop in the crime rate. 

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, by Stephen Covey 

  • Focus and act on what can be controlled and influenced, instead of what can’t.
  • Define clear measures of success and create a plan to achieve them for both life and work.
  • Prioritize and achieve the most important goals instead of constantly reacting to urgencies.
  • Develop innovative solutions that leverage diversity and satisfy all key stakeholders.
  • Collaborate more effectively with others by building high-trust relationships of mutual benefit.

Boundaries, by Henry Cloud, John Townsend

  • Biblically-based answers to these and other tough questions, showing us how to set healthy boundaries with our parents, spouses, children, friends, co-workers, and even ourselves.

 

We love hearing from you so please keep those questions coming! 

Chris LoCurto

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September 15, 2015

Life After LifePlan – Success Stories Part 1

September 15, 2015 | By | No Comments">No Comments

We hear a lot about people saying, “We’d like to hear from more people who have experienced some of our events, LifePlan, StratPlan.” We have somebody who has been through both on today’s show.

Brent Van Haren is joining us today to talk about the impact that LifePlan and StratPlan has had on his family and business.

I wanted to talk a lot about LifePlan, but since Brent went through StratPlan as well, I wanted to know  what the experience was like for StratPlan. So I asked.

“That’s a good question. StratPlan was pretty powerful for us in our business. I think I told you afterwards in the first couple of months afterwards that it was by far the most impactful thing that I’ve been a part of in the business.

I’ve been there about 8 years. It has helped change our direction, changed our understanding of who we are. It’s really allowed us to focus on what we need to rather than just what we thought we should.”

Your dad had just gone through LifePlan. What did you experience going through that event? Obviously, the event itself was big and intense. Here you’ve got your dad that’s just a couple of days out of LifePlan. What did you see? What did you experience? What did you notice?

“I think the first thing, my dad’s a high D and raised by a Dutch farmer. Emotions aren’t really worn on the sleeve at any point. The first thing I noticed is just how open, and vulnerable, and then emotional in a really healthy way that he was for the first couple days.

That was really powerful. There was only 72 hours between the LifePlan and the StratPlan. He was still riding high on the LifePlan wave. It was intense, but immediately I realized how much I wanted to attend the LifePlan.”

You came down and did your LifePlan. What was that experience like for you?

“What was it like? It was probably, other than the birth of my daughter, as far as a 48 hour period goes, it was the most powerful 48 hours that I have had in my life. It was just so eye-opening and beneficial for me.

To be honest, it’s been about 10 months, and the longer I am away from it, the more impact it has had. It allowed me to really start to put into place some of the things that I learned.”

What would you say was the most profound thing that you learned in that process?

“There are a lot of things I learned in that process. For me, the thing that was hardest, that we spent 2 hours of you drilling into my head one morning was that I’m not responsible for other people’s well-being.

That was a hard one for me to get my head wrapped around. That took a while. My number one talent that we identified is a happiness transfer agent, conducting people on the happiness train. :-) I was able to acknowledge that that’s a real strength. I had never really looked at it that way.”

A strength because you are talented at it. It’s something that you do great! Pre-LifePlan, would you say that’s where you got self-worth?

“Yeah, it was very much a burden that I put on myself. I felt I had to make other people happy, or bringing them forward, or that it was my responsibility. It’s shaped a lot of areas in my life.”

Are you still able to use that talent now in a different way?

“I get to embrace it for what it is and not feel that it’s my responsibility. I have a brother in the business. I don’t feel like it’s my responsibility to make him happy, or to make him feel a different way. I have an impact on that, but it’s not my responsibility.”

What would happen pre-LifePlan when you were trying to make people happy, or make a person happy and it just wasn’t working? How would you feel and what would tell yourself?

“I don’t have a lot of negatives when you look at the things that put the brakes on, but that would be one of them. I felt like I had to bring someone out. Number 1, sometimes they just don’t want to be.

Number 2, it’s just not healthy how much energy I invest in trying to do that. I can’t say it was a conscious thing, but it was something that would really weigh on me. It created a lot of stress in my life.”

What other things were profound for you in the process?

“I always knew I didn’t have physical boundaries. I didn’t know that I didn’t have emotional boundaries. It ties in with that responsibility, that sense of responsibility that I had for other people’s well-being.  

I had zero boundaries in my life, and it also created a lot of stress. I’m a high D/I personality. My wife is a 99 S/C, polar opposites. My need to just do things that other people ask to make other people happy and to do whatever, created a lot of stress in our relationship.

The understanding and the ability for me to process and say, “Do I want to do something? How is that going to impact my real goals, which are, my family and my spirituality, and the other things in my life? Is this something I have to say yes to?”

It brought stress to your marriage, your relationship because would you say that you were a people-pleaser?

“I had to say, “Yes” to everything. I still struggle with it. It’s something that I’m still working on. I’m able to acknowledge it very quickly if I’ve over-committed and if we have created that stress. I know where it’s coming from. I’m able to fix it quickly.”

As an individual, would you sum it up as health? The greatest change has been your healthier emotionally? Healthier in where you get your self-worth, your self-esteem?

“Absolutely! I feel comfortable with where I get those things. I know quickly now if I’m out of line, if I just need to re-adjust.”

I think that is one of the most powerful things on the other side of LifePlan!

You have the tools to be able to go, “Ah, there it is. All right, back off of that and move forward.” I love that freedom of being able to know what it is and see what it is. Did you come in with reservations?

“There were definitely reservations. I was working myself up the day before and the morning of.  I was praying for honesty, openness, vulnerability, just wanting to make sure that I was just in the right place, that I was honest with myself. I was worried I would dodge some of the harder things if I could.”

What made it safe for you not to do that?

“You say it a lot, but I don’t think people really realize it until they get to know you that there is just zero judgement in the process. There is nothing but openness, and engagement, and sincerity. That made it easy, knowing who you are. Also, the value that I knew would come of it.”

You plugged these things into your life, but you also go back to a business that has recently gone through. Dad’s gone through LifePlan. He’s got big changes in his life.

The company has just gone through a huge event, StratPlan, big changes in the company. How do you see the business coming out of your LifePlan? How do you see it now? How has that helped?

 “It’s a lot easier for me to embrace what I do well and not get trapped in the things that I don’t do well, which has been the previous years, the last 4 years before StratPlan and LifePlan.

I didn’t really realize how much of my role was things that just aren’t natural to me. I wasn’t very effective at them and wasn’t the leader that I wanted to be. The LifePlan really helped me understand what I’m good at; allowed me to embrace it.

It allowed me to focus on more of my strengths rather than some of the things that just don’t come easily to me. Personally, that’s definitely impacted me. As a leader, I meet with all of the people that I lead, 1 on 1 every other week.

They’re like mini 1 1/2 hours sessions of LifePlan now instead of before it was just focus, how are we doing. Now it’s all about the individual because I understand so much clearer now.

It doesn’t really matter what is happening and how they execute the job if there’s some stuff underneath that we just need to understand and talk about and be open with. It’s really changed how I engage with my team.”

You’re really experiencing how people bring their root system to work every single day?

“It’s amazing once the curtain’s pulled back on that! We really dig a lot deeper with my team members and understand each other.

I am able to share what I struggle with so much easier because I know. That makes a big difference in how open we can be with each other and where we can get as a team.

We have a phenomenal team here. It has had a huge impact. We’ve been focusing on culture as of StratPlan. That was a big thing that came out, is how we communicate, what our culture is. This has really helped be a catalyst for that even more that it would have been.”

Your Dad went through. You went through. Your brother went through. You guys have sent 3 other leaders through. Why and what are you seeing there?

“There’s a different understanding now of each other, a different patience, not just with each other who have been through LifePlan, but just with people. It’s so much easier for me to look past the behaviors because I understand that they come from someplace else.

We’re able to really just engage with each other as people rather than as business acquaintances, or whatever. We just really engage as people. It’s really shaping our company to be a pretty phenomenal place to work.”

Power in team members, and leaders going through. It’s not just one person who’s realized this and is trying to change a culture, but now you have a team of people that are in it together, working to change the culture. Does it make it easier for you to lead?

“The big thing that I think it helps me as a leader is so much of it comes back to understanding myself. It’s so important for me and for really anyone to understand who they are. I am able to engage with others.

It’s changed every aspect of how I lead. There’s just this openness and comfort with me and with others that is just so different than before.”

I want to step back again just a little bit. We’ve talked about you. We’ve talked about the business. We’ve touched a little bit on what it’s like coming home. What’s the experience like now as a husband?

What is the experience like for you? What is life like now for you? How do you see your daughter? What adjustments have you made as a husband? What do you see as a husband? What adjustments and what do you see as a father?

“I was talking to Stacy, my wife, about how I’m trying to be deliberate with Addie, our daughter. I understand I’m not going to do everything right. I’m at least trying to be deliberate in what of my natural behaviors I push on to her, or I encourage or don’t encourage within her.

One of the things that you really helped me see is that I get self-worth by being productive in any given moment, so trying to make sure that at some point I instill a good work ethic in Addie.

The ability to choose and find her self-worth from the right places, from her spirituality and other things, not just from what she thinks other people want to see.”

For anyone who’s out there, there’s a lot of people listening, business owners, leaders, individuals, stay at home moms, that have not gotten around to doing LifePlan. “I’ll get it. I need to, yeah, I need to do that. Ah, I’ll get to it.”

That is one of the things that we hear a lot is people saying, “You know, I know I’ve needed to do this for 2 years.” What would you say to them about getting in?

“My dad has been through LifePlan, my brother. I have been through LifePlan. It changes generations. It’s going to change Addie. She’s going to have more awareness for her children, or the people that are close to her in her life. It has a long lasting impact. I would never have realized these.

There’s just nothing else in my life I ever would have encountered that would’ve helped me see that. To have that big of an impact, is pretty amazing. That’s where some people do have a lot of anxiety, or concern about the experience, about the 2 days that LifePlan is.

I just try to really look at the big picture, 2 days of discomfort, I’ll say, is worth a lifetime of better choices, and better understanding, and better decisions. For me, it’s a no brainer to invest the time, and the money, and the effort, and the discomfort to come out on the other side so different and so aware. It’s amazing.”

Last question. If you could go back to a young Brent Van Haren, what would you tell him?

“I made a lot of decisions when I was young for other people. Still working on that today. I wouldn’t change any of the trajectory of my life because of my amazing wife and daughter.

There are plenty of decisions that I look back on and don’t understand myself. There are just a lot of things that I would’ve changed about me and my need to please others rather than just a passion that isn’t a need to make others happy. A lot stems from that for me.”

That’s one of the best things that you can learn coming through LifePlan, is that the thing that you’ve done that unfortunately you got self-worth from remains the thing that you get to do most likely. It’s from a completely different direction, different purpose.

QUESTION: What is holding you back from LifePlan?

 

Chris LoCurto

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November 18, 2013

Why Strategic Planning Matters

November 18, 2013 | By | 2 Comments">2 Comments

What if you had a way of knowing what your greatest opportunities were as well as the most important things your organization should be focusing on right now?

Most entrepreneurs start their business by discovering a way to make a widget or provide a service and sell it. They’ll spend countless hours and years struggling to figure out a way to grow exponentially, create reoccurring income, and find a life in the process.

While many business owners have continued growth, what they don’t see is the incredible number of opportunities being missed on a daily basis. On top of that, they continue to hire people in positions that they perceive to be necessary. All along not knowing if some, or most of the positions are needed.

Are there other areas they should be focusing their time and money on? Are there areas of the company that shouldn’t exist? What are the opportunities that are being missed, and what’s the best way to capitalize on them?

When I started my business, I knew everything I did would be centered around helping people find purpose in their lives, growing leaders to greatness, and impacting businesses on levels bigger than they ever experienced.

I added some processes to what I’ve been teaching businesses and leaders on for over a decade, and developed our Strategic Planning Event.

The event has been so powerful to so many businesses, that I asked just a few of them to share their stories about the event.

“You can’t run your business at the level it has the potential to be unless you have this information.” – Brian Staley, ITG

If you’re ready to take your business to the next level, click here and get more information. Don’t wait for growth, make it happen today!

Question: What have you done to grow strategically in your business?

Chris LoCurto

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July 3, 2013

What’s So Great About Perspective Anyway?

Perspective is one of those words that rarely gets the credit it deserves. Usually when we talk about it, we just think, “It’s my way of looking at things.”

Chris LoCurto, Leadership, Business, Strategic Planning

Last night we started another Strategic Planning event that will run through Friday. And let me say that these events are having stellar results! By far the most powerful event I’ve ever done!

When I explain the event to someone, I say that we spend a great deal of time gaining perspective. That’s when they usually look at one of us with a confused look like, “You’re kidding. How much perspective could you possible need?”

To tell you the truth, for a long time I’ve taught and coached leaders and entrepreneurs by getting perspective on their business, and how they got to where they are. Then I would tell them exactly what they need to do and HOPE they do it.

And while I always received the greatest of testimonies, I wanted to dig much further in-depth. Why? Because I know what can be done when I completely pull the business apart, give “perspective” to the leadership, and put it back together with the most important things for them to focus on that NOBODY saw coming.

Which brings us to what we open every Strategic Planning event with: an Eastern cultural way of looking at things. Thus the funny pic above.

In our Western culture we have a fast way of solving problems. “Have a problem? Fix it!” We have a tendency to go straight to the problem and fix it right away.

Many Eastern cultures, however, have a different way of solving problems. They go towards the problem, and then spend a decent amount of time circling the problem gaining perspective through analysis and diagnostics.

In fact, they will circle the problem until they have the right amount of perspective to make a decision.

If you turn the diagram on it’s side, it’s a spiral upward to the point when the best decisions will be made.

When people come in, they always come with a set ideas of what’s wrong in their business. I usually set them aside because I understand that their beliefs are usually not their biggest issues. When they leave they say the event was way greater than they ever expected!

For years people have said to me, “How in the world did you figure that out about our business? How could you see that.” To which I say, “It’s easy. I’ve been doing this for a REALLY long time, and I’m not emotionally attached to your business.”

You see, our first step in EVERY Strategic Plan, Coaching session, or teaching, is to get perspective. Once we have it, we can not only fix just about anything, but see the HUGE opportunities being missed.

The last company that was here walked a way with a plan to increase their revenues THREE MILLION IN TWELVE MONTHS!! How? Simple. Three days of us ripping their business apart, finding those opportunities, finding the major problems that need to be addressed, and putting it all back together again with an ACTUAL working plan!

None of that could be done without that important word perspective. Are you ready to see what my team can do to explode your business? If so, click here and get started.

Question: How important is gaining perspective to you?