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Customer service

Chris LoCurto

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January 31, 2017

What Toxic Culture Looks Like, And How To Avoid It

January 31, 2017 | By | One Comment">One Comment

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Terrible customer service can be incredibly frustrating. This week we had a taste of it at the office. Here’s why it matters in your leadership…

Today we are talking about customer service. Here’s the phone call we experienced at our office this week, listen here:

[jump to 4:45]

It takes a lot to get me upset… this phone call did it pretty quick.

For me, caring more about money, making a sale, than serving God’s kids is a spiritual issue.

There comes a time in your role as a leader where you have to take responsibility for your company’s actions. Don’t be surprised if you lose business when you treat the actual business…like business! Instead, you have to treat your customers like they are actually the ones contributing to your 401K. Treat your customers like they’re the ones who are putting the food on your table.

Yes, there are times that the customer is wrong. I believe that. The customer might not always be right, but the customer should be honored. To continually mistreat customers and then wonder why you’re losing business, is ridiculous.

After listening to the phone call, do you see the culture that’s inside of this business? For me, culture comes down to two things: actions and attitudes. What you teach, what you lead, the integrity you teach…it becomes DNA in a business.

You have to ask yourself this question: “Is money worth having this kind of culture, DNA, in your business?”

If you want to be successful in creating a phenomenal culture… you must define it.

Here’s what you can do this week:

  1. Write down what you want your culture to look like. Define it! What actions do you want when it comes to: working, clients and customer service, team members, leadership? Integrity? Culture?
  2. Ask yourself the questions first, then bring others in and see their feedback. Ask if you measure up as a business to what you wrote down.
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Chris LoCurto

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March 25, 2013

Customer Service: Do You Really Care?

March 25, 2013 | By | 48 Comments">48 Comments

Customer Service is something you hear me preach about quite a bit here. To me, it’s the lifeblood of your organization. Without at least good customer service, few people care about your product.

Customer Service

Recently I attended a conference in Colorado. (Having been to a ton of events, and perhaps put on one or seven hundred myself, I was pretty excited that we had two great instructors in Pete Richardson and Michael Murphy.)

During one of the sessions, Pete shared about an experience he had with the now defunct CompUSA. Early in his last business he had used CompUSA to get all of his computers up and running…and continuously fixed.

He got to a point where he was so frustrated with CompUSA’s customer service that he was just done. He went to the store that he had been using and wanted to let the manager know what was going on.

As he walked in he noticed the manager standing under a sign that listed the companies core values. As he looked up and read them, he thought to himself that they were pretty solid.

He then decided to let the manager know what was going on. He said, “I am taking my business elsewhere and I thought you might want to know why”. To which the store manager said, “No…I really don’t.”

Without the need to respond, Pete left the store and never went back.

There comes a time in your role as a leader or entrepreneur where you have to take responsibility for your companies actions. Is there any doubt it was this kind of attitude towards customers that caused the retail chain to die off?

 You can’t be surprised that you lose business when you treat the actual business like…business! Instead, you have to treat your customers like they are actually the ones contributing to your 401K.

Yes, there are times that the customer is wrong. I do believe that. But to continually mistreat customers, and then wonder why you’re wearing a paper hat flipping burgers, is ridiculous. Understand where your paycheck comes from and respond accordingly. Especially if your speaking under your core values.

Question: How should Pete have been treated?